Video: See how these metal doors withstood a wind speed test

Wind Speed Test

Bray Allen
R&D Manager at DBCI

In the not-so-sexy world of door manufacturing, one might think that a wind test is the one opportunity to inject excitement: full-force wind, shredded metal, petrified onlookers.  In reality, a successful wind test should involve little drama.

DBCI, a manufacturer of quality sheet metal doors, has been conducting wind tests for nearly 25 years.   This past April, DBCI hired the services of Certified Testing Laboratories out of Orlando, Florida to manage third party tests of its new Curl-Lok door.

To begin, two DBCI employees mount a new DBCI door to a special vacuum chamber.  Then they spend the better part of a day prepping conditions for the test with the 5-person on-site staff.  The chamber is outfitted to run positive (exterior force) and negative (interior force) pressure tests to make sure the door complies with ASTM E330 and ANSI/DASMA 108 requirements.

The action itself lasts only a few minutes.  Pressure that correlates with estimated wind speed is applied beyond the required wind load and measured with an on-site engineer.  Often, wind loads on various door sizes can be extrapolated from one test. The tests also include using the same jams in actual metal buildings, a way to better gauge the real-world durability of the product, and an extra step DBCI performs on every new product or when codes change.

You can view the recent test of our Curl-Lok product in the video below.

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Bray Allen

Bray Allen is R&D Manager at DBCI, a leading manufacturer of rolling sheet doors. During ten years with DBCI, Allen has directed hundreds of projects, including a revitalization effort of DBCI’s wind-rated series and the development of the new Curl-Lok door. With over 20 years of field experience, he is also the second vice chair of DASMA’s rolling door division and chairman of the rolling sheet door subcommittee.

2 Comments

  • Reply August 22, 2014

    Bill Munich of Cranston Steel Structures

    1. When is Star going to offer the Curl-Lok doors with Star Buildings?

    2. Will Star classify the Curl-Lok door as “wind rated” to keep its building design enclosed?

    3. The DBCI rep does not represent Curl-Lok to have any wind resistance advantage over their 2500 series. I he wrong?

    • Star Building Systems
      Reply September 4, 2014

      Star Building Systems

      Mr. Munich,

      Thank you for your interest! We’re happy to help you with any information you need. Here are the answers to your questions. Please let us know if you need anything additional.

      1. When is Star going to offer the Curl-Lok doors with Star Buildings?
      Even though Curl-Lok doors are not part of SBS, they can be ordered with your Star Building by contacting Estimating.
      2. Will Star classify the Curl-Lok door as “wind rated” to keep its building design enclosed?
      The Curl-Lok 2500 series offers a similar wind load rating as the standard DBCI 2500 series door. As for strength, Curl-Lok doors do not offer any advantage over the standard DBCI door.
      3. The DBCI rep does not represent Curl-Lok to have any wind resistance advantage over their 2500 series. Is he wrong?
      The real advantage of the Curl-Lok product is maintenance and replacement. The door is constructed out of removable panels with engineered curls along the edges that lock into place instead of seam together, making it the first rolling sheet door that can be quickly repaired on site without any specialty tools.

      We hope that helps!

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